Self Leadership Blog
by Andrew Bryant

Executive Presence Definition and Career Strategy

Think of the most confident person you know. Think of how they stand, how they hold the space and how, when they speak, everyone listens. This is Executive Presence.

Executive Presence Definition 

"Executive Presence is the ability to project confidence and gravitas (substance) under pressure."

In addition a person with executive presence can present effectively and has the ability to 'read the room', so that they can influence an audience.

In a complex, fast paced world it is vital to be noticed, heard and trusted. Executive Presence is therefore an essential competency for both individual contributors and leaders.

Career Strategy

In my 20-years of experience as an executive coach, working with C-level executives and those that want to crack the C-Suite, I have observed that those who are successful have mastered executive presence.

I have created a free Masterclass on how to to develop executive presence and you can watch it here. You can also read these 12-Strategies...

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How to be a Great Keynote Speaker

You hear the MC say, “Please welcome to stage, our Keynote Speaker”.

Is your heart racing? Are your palms sweaty? Are you wondering what you are going to say?

Public speaking is purported to be the number 1, fear or phobia, beating out fear of death, so why would you want to be a Keynote Speaker, and if you do, how can you be good at it?

I have been a Motivational Leadership Speaker for over 20-Years, and I have coached and mentored hundreds of executives and upcoming speakers to present with poise and confidence, to leave a lasting impact on their audiences.

Keynote Speaker – or Main-Stage Talk?

Sometimes the term ‘Keynote Speaker’ gets misused; it’s like someone who has posted a blog on HBR calling themselves a ‘Harvard Business Review’ columnist.

A keynote speech is a presentation, usually of 20 to 60-minutes, that establishes a main underlying theme, framework or ‘big idea’ of the conference or convention....

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An Extra-Ordinary Woman shows Self-leadership

In 2010, a shy Spanish-speaking South American woman, leaves her home and family to start a challenging new job in Singapore.

I asked her, what she was thinking and feeling at that time. “I was very afraid” she said. “But I thought I would be good, because I was invited to be part of a big project.”

Then, what was she afraid of? “Of meeting people better than me”, she said.

Does this resonate? Do you compare yourself with others, and give them more credibility than you give yourself?

I asked Victoria (not her real name, not her photo) what she thought she brought to the job, what strengths she had that would enable her to be good.

“I am very focused and understand the complexity of projects, I can work with different people from different cultures and build trust.”

I asked her, “How many people in the world can do what you do, the way you do it?” And her answer was, “Not very many”. So, I asked why she...

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Be the Hero in your Story

In our 2012 book 'Self-leadership' my co-author, Ana Kazan Ph.D. and I make the following statement:

"There are no fairy godmothers - If you want to be transformed, to be free, you must do the work; you are the hero, you are your own savior."

It is a truism that Life is not fair. We are not all born with parents who validate our self-esteem and provide opportunities for us to learn and grow; sometimes circumstances are downright cruel. But success is measured not by what you have but how much you have grown inside, and this comes by motivating yourself to overcome obstacles and live with purpose.

In fact those that have ‘moved the dial’ or ‘achieved the delta’ by going from a D grade to a C, and a C to a B are much more resilient than those who have always gotten A’s.

The Hero’s Journey

Mythologist Joseph Campbell tracked the hero's journey, a common theme in all cultures (and Hollywood), which is the process by which...

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Confidence for Managers and Leaders

Confidence is 'the' key success factor for modern managers and leaders and yet many lack confidence in the following areas:

  1. Managing downwards when subordinates have higher qualifications or are qualified in a different discipline
  2. Influencing peers when there is no direct authority
  3. Managing upwards because you need to influence your boss
  4. Influencing outwards to clients and vendors

With all these scenarios the keys to confidence are, 1) accepting that you are valuable and have contributions to make (Self-esteem), 2) taking ownership of your thought and feelings (Personal Power) and 3) communicating what you want (Executive Presence). In short, the application of Self-leadership.

Confidence for Managers and Leaders

When managing downwards, managers need to remember Henry Ford who said, “The generalist will always employ the specialist.” The manager doesn’t need to know everything about everyone’s discipline they need to know how to engage smart people to get...

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